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Frequently Asked Questions about Fosamax

Jaw Bone Death Lawsuit Information

Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about alendronate (Fosamax), men with osteoporosis, ONJ, bisphosphonates, and class action lawsuits.

  What is alendronate?
  What should I know about Fosamax?
  Why is Fosamax prescribed?
  How should I take Fosamax?
  What happens if I miss a dose?
  What happens if I overdose on Fosamax?
  What other drugs will affect Fosamax?
  Do men get osteoporosis?
  What is ONJ? (osteonecrosis of the jaw)
  What are the symptoms of ONJ?
  What drugs are considered bisphosphonates?
  What is a class action lawsuit?
  Can I afford a Fosamax lawyer?

 

What is alendronate?
Alendronate is a compound that alters the cycle of bone formation and breakdown in your body. Alendronate actually increases new bone formation.
 

What should I know about Fosamax?
(Fosamax is the brand name for alendronate — a LEN dro nate)
Some forms of alendronate are taken once a day; others are taken once a week. It is very important that you follow your doctor's directions. If you take alendronate once a week, take it the same day of every week. After swallowing the tablet, do not lie down, remain fully upright sitting, standing, or walking for at least 30 minutes and until after you have eaten. Do not crush, chew, or suck the tablets; swallow whole. Do not take alendronate at bedtime or before getting up for the day.
 

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Why is Fosamax prescribed?
Fosamax is prescribed to treat and prevent osteoporosis and to treat Paget's disease. Fosamax is also used to treat osteoporosis that is caused by corticosteroid treatment. Fosamax may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.


How should I take Fosamax?
Take Fosamax first thing in the morning, at least 30 minutes before you eat any food or drink any liquid (other than plain water). This timing is very important for getting the maximum amount of medication from each dose. Foods and beverages greatly decrease the effect of Fosamax. Take each dose with a full glass (6 to 8 ounces) of tap water or bottled water. Taking each dose with a full glass of water will ensure proper swallowing of the tablet and reduce the risk of mouth or throat irritation. Do not take this medication with mineral water, juice, or any other beverage.

What happens if I miss a dose?
If you take alendronate every day and miss a dose, skip that dose and take your next regularly scheduled dose the following day. Missing one dose will not affect your treatment. Do not take two tablets at the same time. If you take alendronate once a week and miss a dose, take the missed dose on the morning after you remember. Do not take two tablets on the same day. Return to taking one tablet once a week, as originally scheduled on your chosen day.

What happens if I overdose on Fosamax?
You should contact your doctor and have your doctor file an adverse reaction report with the FDA. You should also consider contacting an expert Fosamax lawyer to discuss your legal rights. Also call the FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088.
 

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What other drugs will affect Fosamax?
Antacids and other medicines taken by mouth may decrease the effects of Fosamax. Do not take any other medicines within 30 minutes after a dose of Fosamax. Talk to your doctor before taking any other medicines during treatment with Fosamax. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, others), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), indomethacin (Indocin, Indocin SR), naproxen (Anaprox, Aleve, Naprosyn), oxaprozin (Daypro), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others may increase the risk of damage to your stomach if they are taken during treatment with Fosamax. Talk to your doctor before taking anti-inflammatory medications, pain relievers, or fever reducers during treatment with Fosamax. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Fosamax. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or herbal supplements.


Do men get osteoporosis?
Yes. Osteoporosis is not considered a women's disease like it once was. Men also get osteoporosis as a result of delayed puberty, inadequate calcium intake, smoking, drinking excessive alcohol, or using medications, such as steroids.

 
What is ONJ (osteonecrosis of the jaw)?
ONJ is a painful, disfiguring condition, which leads to the breakdown of the jawbone. Symptoms include burning, tingling, or localized pain in the jaw, which could lead to serious infections and ultimately jawbone degeneration. Bisphosphonates support the buildup of bone in areas weakened by osteoporosis. Yet, patients may experience the opposite with a breakdown in their lower and upper jawbones which becomes apparent after oral surgery.
 

What are the symptoms of ONJ?
--Irregular sore with exposed bone in the mandible or maxilla
--Pain or swelling in the infected jaw
--Infection, possibly with pus
--Altered sensation (e.g., numbness or heavy sensation)
--Inability to heal after oral surgery
 

What drugs are considered bisphosphonates?
- Alendronate (Fosamax®)
- Clodronate (Bonefos®, Ostac®)
- Etidronate (Didronel®)
- Ibandronate (Boniva®)
- Pamidronate (Aredia®)
- Risedronate (Actonel®)
- Tiludronate (Skelid®)
- Zoledronate (Zometa®)


What is a class action lawsuit?
A class action lawsuit is filed by one or more people on behalf of themselves and a larger group of people who are facing the same issues, in this case, Fosamax and bisphosphonate-related jaw decay symptoms as well as other debilitating symptoms and painful quality of life threatening side effects.

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Can I afford a Fosamax lawyer?
Yes, because it costs you nothing. If we agree to be retained, Monheit Law takes the case on a percentage contingency basis. If you don't win your Fosamax lawsuit, we don't get paid. Contact us for a free NO OBLIGATION inquiry

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