Childhood Cancer FAQs
 

Ewing�s Sarcoma

Do I have a Case?

Childhood Cancer

Symptoms & Treatments

Pediatric Cancer Warning Signs

Childhood Cancer Treatment

FAQs about Ewing�s sarcoma

Childhood Cancer Resources

Ewings Sarcoma News Articles

Ewings Sarcoma Stories

Ewing's Sarcoma Resources

Signs of Childhood Cancer

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Ewing’s sarcoma

What bones are affected by Ewing's sarcoma?
My child has been the victim of a Ewing’s sarcoma medical malpractice. What should I do?
Is Ewing's sarcoma a childhood or an adult disease?
How is Ewing’s sarcoma diagnosed?
Are children given the same treatment for Ewing’s sarcoma as adults?
Are my relatives at risk?
What is the Ewing’s family of childhood cancer tumors?
Is primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) different than Ewing's sarcoma?
What are Askin's childhood cancer tumors?

What bones are affected by Ewing's sarcoma?

The most frequent locations for the primary tumor are the pelvis, femur (thigh bone), tibia / fibula (bones of the lower leg), bones of the spine, ribs, and humerus (upper arm). Other bones are less common; however, Ewing's sarcoma can potentially arise in any of the 206 bones in the body. It can also develop in the soft tissues without bone involvement.


My child has been the victim of a Ewing’s sarcoma medical malpractice. What should I do?

The best thing would be to consult a lawyer for a free, no obligation consultation. Monheit Law takes certain cases on a contingency basis which means that you pay nothing up front or out-of-pocket. You would only pay a percentage of what was gained on your behalf. For a free professional consultation, click here.


Is Ewing's sarcoma a childhood or an adult disease?

Approximately half of all people with Ewing's sarcoma are under 15 years old at diagnosis. However, it is also common in young adults. The peak ages are between 10 and 20. Ewing’s sarcoma is less common before the age of 5 and after the age of 30.


How is Ewing’s sarcoma diagnosed?

If a bone tumor is suspected the doctor should do a complete medical examination. This may include a blood test because childhood bon cancer tumors can be associated with increased levels of certain enzymes in the blood. MRI should be routinely used in the work-up of malignant tumors. MRI will show the full bony and soft tissue extent and relate the tumor to other nearby anatomic structures (e.g. vessels). The doctor may also recommend X-rays and other bone scans. If X-rays and scans suggest that a tumor might be present then a biopsy (removal of a sample of tissue) will be performed. A pathologist will then examine the cells to determine whether they are cancerous, and if so, what type of cancer. Ewing's sarcoma is composed of small, round blue cells; these can appear similar to other types of cancer so special stains and other laboratory tests are needed to correctly make the diagnosis.


Are children given the same treatment for Ewing’s sarcoma as adults?

There is no rationale for treating children and adults differently; chemotherapy is usually the same. However, children are thought to tolerate chemotherapy better than adults. Also children can develop more severe delayed side effects from radiation therapy, such as bone growth retardation. This is one of the factors taken into account before deciding on the type of local therapy given. Studies have shown similar results in adults and children when they are treated with the same protocol.


Are my relatives at risk?

Almost all Ewing's sarcoma childhood cancer tumors change their genetic makeup. Normal human cells contain 23 pairs of chromosomes. In Ewing's sarcoma tumors, a piece of chromosome 11 has moved to chromosome 22 creating new DNA. This does not mean that the disease is passed from parent to child. For genetic change to pass from parent to child, it must be present in the sperm or egg. The genetic change in Ewing's sarcoma childhood cancer tumors occurs in the tumor cells only, not in the sperm or egg. Patients who get Ewing's sarcoma did not inherit the disease from their parents. Patients who survive Ewing's sarcoma and have children do not pass on an increased risk of cancer to their children. Sibling of patients with Ewing's sarcoma does not have an increased risk for Ewing's sarcoma. And of course, cancer is not contagious.


What is the Ewing’s family of childhood cancer tumors?


The Ewing’s family of childhood cancer tumors include Ewing’s tumor of bone; extraosseus Ewing’s (tumor growing outside of the bone); primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), also known as peripheral neuroepithelioma; and Askin’s tumor (PNET of the chest wall). These childhood cancer tumors are rare diseases in which malignant or cancerous cells are found in the bone and soft tissues


Is primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) different than Ewing's sarcoma?

Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET, or more correctly pPNET) start in the bone or soft tissues. Like Ewing's sarcoma they are composed of small-blue-round cells. They differ from Ewing’s sarcoma because they show more developed features of cells associated with the nervous system. Both have a similar response to chemotherapy. Based on these and other similarities Ewing's sarcoma and pPNET are regarded as closely related members of the same family of childhood cancer tumors.


What are Askin's childhood cancer tumors?

Askin’s Tumors are malignant round cell tumors of the thoracopulmonary region (chest wall). Studies have shown cell characteristics of Askin’s Tumors are similar to those of Ewing’s sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), and that a common genetic feature (11;22 chromosomal translocation ) is shared by these three. Findings suggest that Askin’s Tumors, Ewing’s sarcoma, and PNET represent different manifestations of a single tumor type (the Ewing’s sarcoma family of tumors). Clinically, Askin’s present as a mass in the periostium and / or soft tissue of the chest wall. The treatment is local therapy (surgery and / or radiotherapy) combined with systemic chemotherapy. The chemotherapy drugs are generally the same as those used to treat Ewing’s sarcoma / PNET.

 

Do you have a failure to diagnose Ewing’s sarcoma case?


CONTACT INFORMATION
Name of Child
Date of Birth
Name of Parent
E-mail Address:
Address:
City:
State:
Zipcode:
Phone () - ext.

CASE INFORMATION
Date when symptoms first started:
Date of diagnosis of cancer:
What was the diagnosis:
Please describe what happened:

 

 

 Email this page to a friend.

 

Home  |  Site Map  |  Disclaimer  |  Do I Have A Ewings Sarcoma Malpractice Case?

2002-2014 All Rights Reserved Monheit Law.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button